Origins

Langdon Coffee Merchants source green beans from the world’s most exciting coffee origins. Right across the bean belt, we offer roasters a broad selection of traceable cultivars, processing methods and flavour profiles, meeting the needs of speciality and high-end commercial coffee roasters in the UK, New Zealand and Australia. All our beans are extensively cupped for quality assurance at our Melbourne laboratory by a Q-grader before making their way to customers. As well as single origin beans, we offer commercial blending for that discerning, bespoke taste.

Where we source our beans

Origins

Papua New Guinea
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Country:
Papua New Guinea
Geography:

700-2050 MAS, Average temp 13 to 27 degrees in the coffee growing regions

Varieties:

Predominantly Arabica: Typica and Bourbon, other arabicas includes Blue Mountain, Mundo Novo, Arusha, Catura, Catimor, and San Ramon. Also, Robusta and Liberica types are grown.

Usage:

Mainly used as a blender but certain specialty lots are now also used as single-serve.

Flavour Profile:

Ranging from fruity, chocolatey and cocoa notes to more delicate tea like flavours.

Overview:

Coffee has been grown in Papua New Guinea (PNG) since the first white settlers arrived in the late 19th century, but it wasn’t until the war in the Pacific that coffee became an important crop. Before the war, the Robusta varietal was the principal crop grown but Arabica became dominant after 1950’s and remains so to this day. Coffee is currently PNG’s second biggest agricultural export after palm oil and employs approx. 2.5 million people – just about half of PNG’s population. The industry comprises of 86% smallholders, 10% block holders and 4% plantations. PNG is considered one of the most culturally diverse populations in the world with more than 700 different languages spoken. The main growing regions are the Eastern Highlands, Western Highlands, Jiwaka, Morobe, and Simbu provinces which produce about 90% off the coffee grown in PNG. The national coffee association (CIC – Coffee Industry Cooperation) assists the industry with information, support and research. Coffee exporters also provide much support to the industry with guidance, infrastructure, and development.

Relationships at origin:

Langdon Coffee Merchants works with indigenously owned Kongo Coffee.  Situated in the Simbu province, Kongo buys and processes coffee from all the growers in this region. Established in 1999, Kongo have one of the most modern dry mills in the country, allowing them to produce some of the cleanest , high-quality coffee in the country. We work closely with Kongo Coffee on qualities and specialty lots.

Sourcing Strategy:

Langdon Coffee Merchants commits to specific grades and regional specialty lots each year which have become the backbone of our PNG coffee offerings. We can offer pre-contract of these coffees to our valued customer and offer the chance to cup Pre-Shipment samples prior to the coffee being commercially milled. Single producer lots will often come with transparency and we will gladly pass this information on to customers. All coffee purchased must pass our internal QA process at our Cupping Lab in South Melbourne.

How we buy from PNG:

Langdon Coffee Merchants  relies heavily on our partners on the ground at origin. We visit, cup and calibrate with them regularly. Traversing such varied and rugged terrain takes up a considerable amount of time and with the help of our friends on the ground (and their trusty Toyota Land Cruisers) we are fortunate enough to explore remote highland villages and meet directly with farmers.

Cupping Profile:

Most coffee is wet processed and delivers a deliciously rich and sweet cup full of chocolatey, fruity, winey and tea-like flavours depending on the region and growing altitude.

India
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Country:
India
Geography:

Arabica producing areas: 15 to 25 degrees with a relative humidity of 70 to 80 %. Robusta producing areas 20 to 30 degrees with a relative humidity of 80 to 90 %.

Varieties:

Robusta: Peridenia, S.247, CxR Arabica; Kents: Kents is the earliest variety of Arabica, selected by an English planter of the same name during the 1920s. This variety remained popular with the planting community till the 1940s, because it was less susceptible to rust. Today, it is grown in a few areas but it is still known for its exceptional cup quality.

S.795:

This is the most popular Arabica selection released during the 1940s with high yields, bold beans, superior quality and relative tolerance to leaf rust. This selection was developed using ‘Kents’ Arabica, known for its high quality. Even today, the S.795 is a favourite with the planters and is a widely cultivated Arabica variety. S.795 has a balanced cup with subtle flavour notes of Mocca.

Cauvery:

Popularly known as Catimor, Cauvery is a descendant of a cross between ‘Caturra’ and ‘Hybrido-de-Timor’. Caturra is a natural mutant of the famous Bourbon variety. Thus, Cauvery inherited the high yielding and superior quality attributes of Caturra and the resistance of ‘Hybrido-de-Timor’.

Sln.9:

Selection 9 is a derivative of a cross between an Ethiopian Arabica collection, ‘Tafarikela’, and ‘Hybrido-de-Timor’. Sln.9 has inherited all the superior cup quality traits of Tafarikela.

Harvest season:

Arabica: November to January Robusta: December to April.

Usage:

Arabica is mainly used in espresso blends but can also be used as single origin specially the high end and specialty lots. Robusta is primarily used is smaller amounts to increase the body and crema in the blend and to lower the total cost of the blend.

Flavour:

Arabica: Chocolatey, nutty, spicy. Robusta: Earthy, woody, spicy, cereals. Monsooned: Chocolatey, salty, musty, nutty and spice.

Overview:

India has produced coffee for over 150 years and offering intriguing subtlety and stimulating intensity in the cup. India is the only country that grows all its coffee under shade.
Indian coffee has a unique historic flavour too. Legend has it that in year 1600, a Muslim pilgrim with the name of Baba Budan brought seven magical beans from distant Yemen back to India and planted them in the Chandragiri hills of Karnataka. For quite a considerable period, the plants remained as a garden curiosity and spread slowly as back yard plantings. It was during 18th century that the commercial plantations of coffee were started thanks to the success of British entrepreneurs in conquering the hostile forest terrain in south India. India’s coffee growing regions have diverse climatic conditions, which are well suited for cultivation of different varieties of coffee. Some regions with high elevations are ideally suited for growing Arabicas of mild quality while those with warm humid conditions are best suited for Robusta. India cultivates all its coffee under a well-defined two-tier mixed shade canopy, comprising evergreen leguminous trees. Nearly 50 different types of shade trees are found in coffee plantations. Shade trees prevent soil erosion on a sloping terrain; they enrich the soil by recycling nutrients from deeper layers, protect the coffee plant from seasonal fluctuations in temperature, and play host to diverse flora and fauna. You will also find a wide variety of spices and fruit crops like pepper, cardamom, vanilla, orange and banana growing alongside coffee plants.

Relationships at origin:

We work with renowned exporters on our high-end commercial coffees and for estate and specialty lots with Sangameshwar Coffee Estates, situated in the Western Ghats in the state of Karnataka. They have their own mills and produce both Arabica and Robusta.

Sourcing Strategy:

LCM commits to specific grades and specialties each year which have become the backbone of our Indian coffee offerings. We offer precontract these coffees to our valued customer and offer the chance to cup Pre-Shipment samples prior to the coffee being commercially milled. Single producer lots will often come with pricing. transparency down to the wet mill and we will gladly pass this information on to customers. All coffee purchased must pass our internal QA process at our HQ in South Melbourne.

The value chain:

We offer lot specific selection of regional blenders and grades and the opportunity to cup and assess all coffees we have access to through our valued partners on the ground.

How we buy from India:

LCM relies heavily on our partners on the ground at origin. We cup and calibrate with them before each shipment to make sure the cup is as consistent as possible.

Cupping Profile:

low acidity, medium to full body, Chocolatey and subtly spiced in the cup.

Indonesia
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Country:
Indonesia
Geography:

Arabica: 750 to 2000 Masl Robusta: 100 to 900 Masl with temp from 15 degrees to 32 degrees

Varieties:

Arabica: Typica, Tim-Tim, S-288 and S-795, Rambung , Abyssinia, Caturra, Mundo Novo, Catimor. Robusta: KLON BP 308, BP 436, BP 534

Harvest Season:

Sumatra | October to April Java/Bali/Flores | April to October
 Sulawesi | June to December
 Papua | May to August
 Timor | May to September

Usage:

Used in espresso blends primarily for its good body and flavours and – more recently as single serves with the rise specialty coffee production in Indonesia

Flavours:

Sumatra – intense flavour, with cocoa, earth and tobacco notes, Java – good, heavy body, with a lasting finish and herbaceous notes, Bali – sweater than other Indonesian coffees, with nut and citrus notes Sulawesi – good sweetness and body, with warm spices, notes Flores – heavy body, sweetness, chocolate and tobacco notes Papua – heavy body, chocolate, earth and spicy finish

Overview:

Coffee got introduced to Indonesia when the Dutch governor in Malabar (India) sent Arabica coffee seedlings from Yemen to the Dutch governor of Batavia (now Jakarta) in 1699 and from there it spread across Indonesia. Robusta got introduced in the 1876, when the coffee rust disease, Hemileia vastatrix, swept through Indonesia, wiping out most of the Arabica Typica cultivar. Robusta coffee got introduced to East Java in 1900 as a substitute, especially at lower altitudes, where the rust was particularly devastating. Robusta coffee was introduced to smallholders around Kerinci around 1915, and then spread quickly across southern Sumatra during the 1920s, where production soon eclipsed Java. Java remains the most important producing region by volume for Robusta. Today coffee is grown in Sumatra, Java, Sulawesi, Bali Flores, Celebes, Sumbawa and Papau. Coffee production in 2019/2020 was 75,000 tons of Arabica and 567,000 tons of Robusta with Ca. 40% are consumed in Indonesia. Coffee is the 4th largest foreign exchange earner and it generates 0.2% of the Indonesian gross domestic product.

Relationships at origin:

LCM trade with various exporting agencies and COOP’s and have a close relationship with these. Our relationships on the ground are imperative in our purchasing and sourcing the very best of our Indonesian coffees.

Sourcing Strategy:

LCM commits coffees of grade 1 and grade 2 quality of Arabica. We offer these coffees precontract to our valued customer and offer the chance to cup Pre-Shipment samples prior to the coffee being commercially milled. Single producer lots will often come with pricing transparency down to the wet mill and we will gladly pass this information on to customers. All coffee purchased must pass our internal QA process at our HQ in South Melbourne.

The value chain:

We offer lot specific selection of regional blenders and the opportunity to cup and assess all coffees we have access to through our valued partners on the ground. Customisable bag sizes range from 30 and 60kg to metric tonne bulk bags.

Cupping Profile:

Generally, Indonesian coffees has a full body and relatively low acidity. Regions are known for each own typical cupping profile, although there is a great deal of diversity within the regions. Below is a more generic description for each region.

Ethiopia
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Country:
Ethiopia
Geography:

1,500 – 2,200 meters above sea level

Varieties:

Arabica, native heirloom varieties

Harvest Season:

November – February

MOQ:

60kg Grainpro bags

Usage:

Widely used for espresso as single origin or in espresso blends and filter

Flavour Profile:

A wide range of high notes of fruit and floral like citrus, berry, bergamot and jasmine with an elegant, tea-like or winey body depending on the processing methods and grades.

Overview:

Ethiopia is the birthplace of coffee where the coffee production tradition dates back many centuries ago. Ethiopia is the largest coffee producer in Africa and the fifth largest producer in the world accounting for about 4% of the global coffee production. Ethiopian coffee is not only popular outside of the country but also locally as almost half of the country’s production is consumed domestically.

At 1500+ masl, the high elevations allow for the exceptional quality of Ethiopian coffee. Coffee from Ethiopia is known for its complexity and distinctive flavours making it one of the most highly sought after origins.

Relationships at origin:

Strong relationship with partners has always been Langdon Coffee Merchants’ primary focus. When we are not traveling many long hours on bumpy roads around Ethiopia connecting with coffee producers, we work closely with our partner on the ground at Kerchanshe.

Sourcing Strategy:

Langdon Coffee Merchants source a variety of different grades from washed and natural grade 1 coffees to grade 5, including anything in between such as premium grade 4 as opposed to the standard grade 4. This helps us widen our range of offers based upon local market needs. Langdon Coffee Merchants ensure every coffee we buy out of Ethiopia is of exceptional quality. Once coffees are selected, commercially milled or outturn samples are cupped and approved prior to coffees being shipped.

The value chain:

Most coffee growers in Ethiopia are small. Once ripen and picked, coffee cherries are sold to their local washing stations. Coffee is processed using the wet (washed), dry (natural) or what we have seen in the recent years honey techniques. Washing stations then deliver parchment to warehouses where coffee is graded by region, size, defect count and cupping quality before export. Our partner at Kerchanshe own multiple washing stations and a dry mill/warehouse in Addis Ababa.

How We Buy from Ethiopia:

Langdon Coffee Merchants work closely with Kerchanshe who operate in the best coffee growing regions of the country. Every year, when time and resources permit, we travel to origin to visit our partner and select coffees for our local markets. We cup through as many samples as we can to find the right coffees.

Cupping Profile:

Varying from region to region and grade to grade, Ethiopian coffee generally exhibits high notes of fruit like citrus, berry, stone fruit, and floral like jasmine and bergamot. The acidity of washed coffee is often elegant and balanced and body delicate and tea-like while natural Ethiopian coffee can be very sweet with a good amount of winey quality.

Kenya
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Country:
Kenya
Geography:

1,400 – 2,200 masl

Varieties:

SL28, SL34, K7, Ruiru 11, Batian, Kent and Blue Mountain

Harvest Season:

April to June and October to December

MOQ:

60kg Bag

Usage:

E, AA, AB and PB are highly popular as filter or single origin espresso. Other grades such as FAQ AA and FAQ AB are great blending options.

Flavour Profile:

Bold, full bodied and vibrant with intense sweetness and flavours including some distinct tasting notes like blackcurrant, blackberry and cola

Overview:

Located on the East African coast bordering the Indian ocean to the east, Kenya is a country of great diversity and one of the best coffee producers in the world. With the equator running directly through the country, splitting the northern and southern halves, the agricultural terrain is dynamic and varied. The rich volcanic soils, high altitudes, rainfall and temperatures provide Kenya with the perfect coffee growing conditions. Coffee production areas in Kenya are located within the Western, Rift Valley, Central Kenya and Mt Kenya high plateaus, with well known regions such as Embu, Nyeri, Kirinyaga, Kiambu, Machakos, Kisii and Muranga.

Coffee is one of Kenya’s most important crops and a substantial source of income via exports. Most coffee growers in Kenya are smallholder farmers with some small to large coffee estates. Coffee is traditionally grown without shade, but shaded coffee is starting to gain popularity as a result of climate change.

Relationships at origin:

Kenya is among Langdon Coffee Merchants favourites, not only because Kenyan coffee generally offers a stellar cup profile with bold yet vibrant flavours, the relationship with our Kenyan partner also hugely contributes to our love for the origin. With delicious success of the first Kenyan coffees in the Australian, New Zealand, South African and the UK markets in 2019, Langdon Coffee Merchants continues partnering with a Nairobi based exporter Ibero. Through some help from our friends on the ground, countless samples are cupped at our cupping labs every season in the search for great coffees from Kenya.

Sourcing Strategy:

With the help of our partner, Langdon Coffee Merchants cup through many samples to select the best lots for the markets. LCM source different grades of Kenyan coffees from AA, AB, PB to FAQ.

The value chain:

The coffee industry in Kenya is renowned for its cooperative system in production and the auction system of green coffee managed by the Nairobi Coffee Exchange Management Committee.

In Kenya, smallholder coffee farmers harvest and deliver cherries to their respective wet mills for processing. Most Kenyan coffee is washed or wet processed at washing stations owned by cooperative societies and estate farmers, while a small percentage of coffee is natural or dry processed into ‘buni’. Parchment from washing stations is then graded into parchment 1, 2, 3 and lights and ready for dry mills. At dry mills, parchment and buni are milled and graded. Green coffee samples are sent for marketing at the Nairobi Coffee Exchange. When the coffee is auctioned and sold, estate farmers get paid directly whereas smallholder farmers get paid through their cooperative societies.

How we buy from Kenya:

Langdon Coffee Merchants work closely with our friend Nairobi based Ibero for samples and export. A large selection and many rounds of samples are cupped, assessed and compared before being selected. After auction, commercially milled samples from the warehouse are cupped and approved before shipment. Coffee is shipped out of Mombasa port on Kenya’s Indian Ocean coast.

Cupping Profile:

Kenyan coffees offer a huge range of flavors depending on the regions and processing methods used, however, most Kenyan coffees share the common similarities of boldness, distinct character, and sharp and vibrant acidity.

Known for the stellar cup quality and intense flavours, Kenyan coffees are popular among coffee professionals and coffee lovers around the world. Some of the distinctive cupping notes in Kenyan coffees include blackcurrant, cola, citrus, tropical fruit and molasses.

Rwanda
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Country:
Rwanda
Geography:

900m – 1800m altitude, average temperatures from 18 to 30 degrees in coffee producing regions

Varieties:

Bourbon, Typica, Catuai, Mundo Novo, Maragogype, Catimor, Caturra

Harvest Season:

November - March

MOQ:

69kg Bag

Usage:

Full bodied coffees from lower growing regions make excellent espresso blenders, where higher grown coffees often shine as a filter brew

Flavour Profile:

Heavy and moreish coffees from Veracruz to delicate and refined coffees with prominent spice notes from Chiapas and Oaxaca

Overview:

Despite being introduced in the 1700s by Spanish settlers, Mexico only started to value this agricultural stock after border and land disputes in the 1850s. As other Europeans made their way to purchase cheap land in Mexico, the government realised that some of this precious, fertile land (especially in states such as Chiapas and Oaxaca) could produce tremendous and consistent crops of Arabica coffee. Shortly after the Mexican revolution, the government started granting incentives to coffee farmers to help promote and sell their prized coffee to the world. More than 70% of coffee farmers in Mexico operate and farm on less than 10 hectares of land. There are four main growing regions throughout the country

  • Chiapas
  • Oaxaca
  • Puebla
  • Veracruz
Relationships at origin:

LCM works primarily alongside an exporting group based in Veracruz. From this base, we travel up into the mountains to meet directly with producers and explore the wider growing regions of the state. We are growing our Mexican position to work and visit directly with more producers in Chiapas and Oaxaca, but at this stage a lot of the coffee sourced from these regions is commercially milled then blended to form a specific profile that suits our customers’ needs.

Sourcing Strategy:

Most of the Mexican coffee we purchase are regional blenders that we cup and assess alongside our customers. We have recently had the chance to visit some farms experimenting with honey and naturally processed microlots. The more time we spend on the ground visiting growing regions, the more we uncover of this unique and lush country.

The value chain:

One distinct feature of coffee production in Mexico is the very high presence of fair trade and organic coffee available. This allows LCM to offer our customers a wide range of competitively priced certified coffee. Descamex also has a state-of-the-art facility just outside of Veracruz City where all of our El Tucan decaf is processed. As a country, most coffee exported is packed in 69kg bags, but we also offer down packing and upsizing to 1MT bulk bags.

How we buy from Mexico:

Being such a large country requiring, we rely on our exporting partners cupping everything prior to conducting our own QA assessment. This ensures a high and consistent standard of the coffees we even consider for purchase. We are always looking for unique and rewarding lots as we learn and visit this region more regularly.

Cupping Profile:

From the lower altitude areas found within the state of Veracruz which traditionally provide rich and lower acid coffee to the peak of the Oaxacan mountains, Mexican coffees are extremely varied. Floral, cinnamon and cardamom are some of the unique cupping notes we have found in high grown coffees from Oaxaca and Chiapas, whilst honey and natural coffees from Veracruz will boast rum, chocolate and port wine flavour notes.

Tanzania
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Country:
Tanzania
Geography:

900m – 1800m altitude, average temperatures from 18 to 30 degrees in coffee producing regions

Varieties:

Bourbon, Typica, Catuai, Mundo Novo, Maragogype, Catimor, Caturra

Harvest Season:

November - March

MOQ:

69kg Bag

Usage:

Full bodied coffees from lower growing regions make excellent espresso blenders, where higher grown coffees often shine as a filter brew

Flavour Profile:

Heavy and moreish coffees from Veracruz to delicate and refined coffees with prominent spice notes from Chiapas and Oaxaca

Overview:

Despite being introduced in the 1700s by Spanish settlers, Mexico only started to value this agricultural stock after border and land disputes in the 1850s. As other Europeans made their way to purchase cheap land in Mexico, the government realised that some of this precious, fertile land (especially in states such as Chiapas and Oaxaca) could produce tremendous and consistent crops of Arabica coffee. Shortly after the Mexican revolution, the government started granting incentives to coffee farmers to help promote and sell their prized coffee to the world. More than 70% of coffee farmers in Mexico operate and farm on less than 10 hectares of land. There are four main growing regions throughout the country

  • Chiapas
  • Oaxaca
  • Puebla
  • Veracruz
Relationships at origin:

LCM works primarily alongside an exporting group based in Veracruz. From this base, we travel up into the mountains to meet directly with producers and explore the wider growing regions of the state. We are growing our Mexican position to work and visit directly with more producers in Chiapas and Oaxaca, but at this stage a lot of the coffee sourced from these regions is commercially milled then blended to form a specific profile that suits our customers’ needs.

Sourcing Strategy:

Most of the Mexican coffee we purchase are regional blenders that we cup and assess alongside our customers. We have recently had the chance to visit some farms experimenting with honey and naturally processed microlots. The more time we spend on the ground visiting growing regions, the more we uncover of this unique and lush country.

The value chain:

One distinct feature of coffee production in Mexico is the very high presence of fair trade and organic coffee available. This allows LCM to offer our customers a wide range of competitively priced certified coffee. Descamex also has a state-of-the-art facility just outside of Veracruz City where all of our El Tucan decaf is processed. As a country, most coffee exported is packed in 69kg bags, but we also offer down packing and upsizing to 1MT bulk bags.

How we buy from Mexico:

Being such a large country requiring, we rely on our exporting partners cupping everything prior to conducting our own QA assessment. This ensures a high and consistent standard of the coffees we even consider for purchase. We are always looking for unique and rewarding lots as we learn and visit this region more regularly.

Cupping Profile:

From the lower altitude areas found within the state of Veracruz which traditionally provide rich and lower acid coffee to the peak of the Oaxacan mountains, Mexican coffees are extremely varied. Floral, cinnamon and cardamom are some of the unique cupping notes we have found in high grown coffees from Oaxaca and Chiapas, whilst honey and natural coffees from Veracruz will boast rum, chocolate and port wine flavour notes.

Burundi
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Country:
Burundi
Geography:

1,200- 2100 meters above sea level

Varieties:

Bourbon, and Bourbon cultivars like Jackson, Mibirzi

Harvest Season:

March - July

MOQ:

60kg Grainpro bags

Usage:

Widely used for espresso and filter as single origin. 

Flavour Profile:

A wide range of fruit and floral like berries, citrus, bergamot and jasmine with an elegant, tea-like or winey body depending on the processing methods.

Overview:

After gaining independence in 1962 Burundi has endured almost constantly instability, with two civils wars, genocides, and coups contributing to the country being one of the poorest in the world.  Only 13% of the population live in urban centres making agriculture, and in particularly coffee extremely important to their GPD. In 2008 the government allowed coffee to enter the private sector with the establishment of The Regulatory Authority of the Coffee Sector (ARFIC) and Intercafe Burundi.

There are between 600,000 – 800,000 coffee growing families in Burundi. Burundian farmers generally growing coffee along with other crops to help diversify income and to feed their families. Coffees are predominantly managed by co-ops and or privately owned washing stations. Grown mostly within 5 main regions of Buyenzi, Kirimiro, Mumirwa, Bweru, and Bugesera.

Relationships at origin:

LCM have partners on the ground that help us to sort and find coffees in Burundi. In particular we work with Ramadhan Salum from CPC. Salum also owns 4 washing stations, Buziraguhindwa, Mbririzi, Shembati, and Sehe.

Sourcing Strategy:

Langdon Coffee Merchants source a variety of different microlots that are washed, double washed, or naturally processed. We do also source regional blenders. This helps us widen our range of offers based upon local market needs. Langdon Coffee Merchants ensure every coffee we buy out of Burundi is of exceptional quality. Once coffees are selected, commercially milled or outturn samples are cupped and approved prior to coffees being shipped.

The value chain:

Most coffee growers in Burundi are small, and use the number of trees they have to explain their size. Average size being 250-300 trees. Once ripen and picked, coffee cherries are sold to their local washing stations. Coffee is processed using the washed, double washed or natural. Washing stations then deliver parchment to warehouses where coffee is graded by region, size, defect count and cupping quality before export. Our partner at CPC own multiple washing stations Buziraguhindwa, Mbririzi, Shembati, and Sehe. 

How we buy from Mexico:

Langdon Coffee Merchants work closely with Salum at CPC who operate in the best coffee growing regions of the country. Every year, when time and resources permit, we travel to origin to visit our partner and select coffees for our local markets. We cup through as many samples as we can to find the right coffees.

Cupping Profile:

Varying from region to region and grade to grade, Burundi coffee’s can showcase traditional East African flavours, or their own unique characteristics. Generally, exhibits a wide range of fruit and floral like berries, citrus, bergamot and jasmine with an elegant, tea-like or winey body depending on the processing methods. The acidity of washed coffee is often elegant and balanced and body delicate and tea-like while natural Burundians coffee can be very sweet, and bold with a good amount of winey quality.

DR Congo
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Country:
DR Congo
Geography:

900m – 1800m altitude, average temperatures from 18 to 30 degrees in coffee producing regions

Varieties:

Bourbon, Typica, Catuai, Mundo Novo, Maragogype, Catimor, Caturra

Harvest Season:

November - March

MOQ:

69kg Bag

Usage:

Full bodied coffees from lower growing regions make excellent espresso blenders, where higher grown coffees often shine as a filter brew

Flavour Profile:

Heavy and moreish coffees from Veracruz to delicate and refined coffees with prominent spice notes from Chiapas and Oaxaca

Overview:

Despite being introduced in the 1700s by Spanish settlers, Mexico only started to value this agricultural stock after border and land disputes in the 1850s. As other Europeans made their way to purchase cheap land in Mexico, the government realised that some of this precious, fertile land (especially in states such as Chiapas and Oaxaca) could produce tremendous and consistent crops of Arabica coffee. Shortly after the Mexican revolution, the government started granting incentives to coffee farmers to help promote and sell their prized coffee to the world. More than 70% of coffee farmers in Mexico operate and farm on less than 10 hectares of land. There are four main growing regions throughout the country

  • Chiapas
  • Oaxaca
  • Puebla
  • Veracruz
Relationships at origin:

LCM works primarily alongside an exporting group based in Veracruz. From this base, we travel up into the mountains to meet directly with producers and explore the wider growing regions of the state. We are growing our Mexican position to work and visit directly with more producers in Chiapas and Oaxaca, but at this stage a lot of the coffee sourced from these regions is commercially milled then blended to form a specific profile that suits our customers’ needs.

Sourcing Strategy:

Most of the Mexican coffee we purchase are regional blenders that we cup and assess alongside our customers. We have recently had the chance to visit some farms experimenting with honey and naturally processed microlots. The more time we spend on the ground visiting growing regions, the more we uncover of this unique and lush country.

The value chain:

One distinct feature of coffee production in Mexico is the very high presence of fair trade and organic coffee available. This allows LCM to offer our customers a wide range of competitively priced certified coffee. Descamex also has a state-of-the-art facility just outside of Veracruz City where all of our El Tucan decaf is processed. As a country, most coffee exported is packed in 69kg bags, but we also offer down packing and upsizing to 1MT bulk bags.

How we buy from Mexico:

Being such a large country requiring, we rely on our exporting partners cupping everything prior to conducting our own QA assessment. This ensures a high and consistent standard of the coffees we even consider for purchase. We are always looking for unique and rewarding lots as we learn and visit this region more regularly.

Cupping Profile:

From the lower altitude areas found within the state of Veracruz which traditionally provide rich and lower acid coffee to the peak of the Oaxacan mountains, Mexican coffees are extremely varied. Floral, cinnamon and cardamom are some of the unique cupping notes we have found in high grown coffees from Oaxaca and Chiapas, whilst honey and natural coffees from Veracruz will boast rum, chocolate and port wine flavour notes.

Brazil
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Country:
Brazil
Geography:

500 – 1700 masl

Varieties:

Harvest Season:

May-October

MOQ:

60kg Grainpro bags

Usage:

Perfect high-volume lots for espresso use. More recently, high-quality micro-lots are being produced regularly

Flavour Profile:

Chocolate sweetness, dark fruit, caramelized nuts

Overview:

Brazil is famed for being the largest coffee producer in the world and its focus is on volume and cost management. The typical flavour profile of a Brazilan coffee does not command the highest price in the market compared to what it costs to produce, so efficient farming processes are a must. More recently we have seen producers encouraged to experiment with varieties and processing to challenge and progress what we think of when it comes to a “typical” Brazilian coffee. Expect to see more of these coffees in time.

The value chain:

There are a wide range of producer in Brazil. From large scale, very well run businesses with mechanical picking and drying, to small to medium scale operations. Coffee. Coffees processed and dry milled before being offered to exporters and co-op’s, who will then sort and clean ready for export.

Cupping Profile:

Typically we see rich, full bodied, chocolatey sweet coffees with low acidity. This gives Brazil its popularity when included in Espresso (especially at high volume). More recently an exciting shift has begun whereby we have started to see process driven coffees, giving big funky fruit flavours and deep complexity.

Colombia
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Country:
Colombia
Geography:

1100 – 2100m Altitude, Average temperatures from 8 to 24 degrees in coffee producing regions

Varieties:

Bourbon, Colombia, Typica, Castillo, Tabi, Gesha, many more.

Harvest Season:

October to January / March to July

Flavour Profile:

Fruit-driven, cola sweetness, berries, highly dependent on region or microclimate.

Overview:

Colombia has been producing coffee for over 230 years now, originally being grown in Santander, Cundinamarca, Antioquia and Caldas with the first reported export in 1808. Contributing to 16% of all agricultural export out of Colombia. Coffee production in Colombia employs over 500,000 producers and their families. Around 95% of Colombian coffee growing families grow coffee on small plots of land averaging 5 acres each.

In 1927 the FNC (Federación Nacional de Cafeteros de Colombia) was established as a business association to promote production and exportation of Colombian coffee. The FNC is now the largest rural non-profit organization in the world. The FNC exports approximately 30% of all Colombian coffee.

Colombia has some of the most unique biodiversity in the world, from arid deserts in the Santander to lush tropical rain forest in the Amazon. This helps create the exceptional growing conditions and helps contribute to the two harvest they have a year. Meaning we can source fresh crop Colombians year-round.

Currently we source coffee from these regions, and within we have micro regional lots:  Huila and Tolima

Relationships at origin:

Langdon Coffee Merchants works with various exporting agencies alongside co-ops and producers directly. Our relationships on the ground are imperative in our purchasing and sourcing of Colombian coffee. We have a unique and amazing relationship with our friends in Cedro Alto who are at the forefront of sourcing fully traceable, sustainable and transparent coffees and specialise in sourcing coffee from the most remote and underdeveloped parts of Colombia.

Whenever possible, Langdon Coffee Merchants cup and do pre-selection at origin to calibrate and give feedback to producers, and to have firsthand information of what we are tasting and buying.

Even where we cannot travel to origin, all coffees are cupped, and properly scored and evaluated before purchase.

LCM pre-contract coffees and volumes which enables producers to improve their production and planning.

LCM has full traceability on stock lots coming out of Colombia. Ranging from fully transparent microlots, FTO, certified organic to AA Grade Supremo.

Sourcing Strategy:

Most of the Mexican coffee we purchase are regional blenders that we cup and assess alongside our customers. We have recently had the chance to visit some farms experimenting with honey and naturally processed microlots. The more time we spend on the ground visiting growing regions, the more we uncover of this unique and lush country.

Whenever possible, Langdon Coffee Merchants cup and do pre-selection at origin to calibrate and give feedback to producers, and to have firsthand information of what we are tasting and buying.

The value chain:

We offer lot specific selection of regional blenders and the opportunity to cup and assess all coffees we have access to through our valued partners on the ground. Customisable bag sizes range from 35kg to metric tonne bulk bags.

How we buy from Colombia:

Langdon Coffee Merchants rely heavily on our partners in Cedro Alto, and MasterCol on the ground at origin. We visit, cup and calibrate with them when time and resources permit.

Cupping Profile:

The abundance of rich volcanic soil in highland areas, tropical climates, dry northlands, and microclimates promotes strong and fertile coffee production and lends itself to producing deliciously clean, vibrant and sparkling coffees. Other regions that are at lower altitudes produce rich and creamy cups with an abundance of body and sweetness. Colombia is a country that is so diversified on the cupping table, it would be hard to give you a traditional cupping profile. It is highly dependent on microclimate and region. Even neighbouring farms with the same varieties can cup differently.

Nicaragua
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Country:
Nicaragua
Geography:

1,000 – 1,500 metres above sea level

Varieties:

Various varieties including Caturra, Bourbon, Pacas, Catuai, Catimor, Maragogype, Pacamara and Java

Harvest Season:

October - February

MOQ:

69kg Grainpro and jute bags

Usage:

Single variety Nicaraguan coffee is widely used as filter and single origin espresso while regional coffee is often used in espresso blend

Flavour Profile:

Citrus fruit, some floral, chocolate and caramel sweetness, medium body and medium to bright acidity

Overview:

Introduced to the country in the 1790s, coffee has been one of Nicaragua’s principle export crops since the 1800s.The coffee sector employs half of the labour force within the agricultural sector and about 15% of the overall labour market in Nicaragua.

Nicaragua coffee is high grown and almost all of it is shade grown. Shade trees on coffee plantations can help conserve the natural environment, protect the soil and retain water during the rainy season. Most coffee producers in Nicaragua are small producing mostly arabica. Coffee production is concentrated in the north central part of the country in the municipalities of Jinotega, Matagalpa and Nueva Segovia.

For a long time, Nicaragua has faced many financial, social, political challenges including limited access to funding, international price volatility, civil wars, natural disasters and the more recent leaf rust outbreak in 2013/14. Nicaragua nevertheless produce high quality coffee with complex flavours.

Relationships at origin:

Langdon Coffee Merchants have developed great relationships with our partners on the ground who produce high quality of regional coffees. Additionally, we have been maintaining close contact with new relationships in the search of exceptional microlot coffees.

Sourcing Strategy:

Langdon Coffee Merchants source regional Strictly High Grown and Fairtrade Organic Strictly High Grown from Nicaragua to meet current demands. The few last harvests, LCM have been exploring the microlots and spreading the love for Nicaraguan coffee with our local coffee communities to generate more interest and demand for coffee from Nicaragua.

The value chain:

Most coffee in Nicaragua is traditionally processed using the wet or washed method. Once processed, coffee is dried on patios. In recent years, farmers have produced honey and natural coffees. Parchment or dried coffee is transported to dry mills and warehouses where coffees are graded and cupped before export.

How We Buy from Nicaragua:

Langdon Coffee Merchants work closely with partners who operate in the best coffee growing regions of the country. With the help from our friends on the ground, samples of regional and microlot coffees are cupped and evaluated prior to being selected and shipped.

Cupping Profile:

Depending on the quality, Nicaraguan coffee generally has tones of citrus with a hint of floral, a medium body and smooth mouthfeel. Notes of caramel and chocolate are present in aroma and are often highlighted in darker roast. Acidity can be anything from medium to bright. Higher grade Nicaraguan coffee exhibits complex fruit and floral notes and bright acidity.

Cuba
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Country:
Cuba
Geography:

900m – 1800m altitude, average temperatures from 18 to 30 degrees in coffee producing regions

Varieties:

Bourbon, Typica, Catuai, Mundo Novo, Maragogype, Catimor, Caturra

Harvest Season:

November - March

MOQ:

69kg Bag

Usage:

Full bodied coffees from lower growing regions make excellent espresso blenders, where higher grown coffees often shine as a filter brew

Flavour Profile:

Heavy and moreish coffees from Veracruz to delicate and refined coffees with prominent spice notes from Chiapas and Oaxaca

Overview:

Despite being introduced in the 1700s by Spanish settlers, Mexico only started to value this agricultural stock after border and land disputes in the 1850s. As other Europeans made their way to purchase cheap land in Mexico, the government realised that some of this precious, fertile land (especially in states such as Chiapas and Oaxaca) could produce tremendous and consistent crops of Arabica coffee. Shortly after the Mexican revolution, the government started granting incentives to coffee farmers to help promote and sell their prized coffee to the world. More than 70% of coffee farmers in Mexico operate and farm on less than 10 hectares of land. There are four main growing regions throughout the country

  • Chiapas
  • Oaxaca
  • Puebla
  • Veracruz
Relationships at origin:

LCM works primarily alongside an exporting group based in Veracruz. From this base, we travel up into the mountains to meet directly with producers and explore the wider growing regions of the state. We are growing our Mexican position to work and visit directly with more producers in Chiapas and Oaxaca, but at this stage a lot of the coffee sourced from these regions is commercially milled then blended to form a specific profile that suits our customers’ needs.

Sourcing Strategy:

Most of the Mexican coffee we purchase are regional blenders that we cup and assess alongside our customers. We have recently had the chance to visit some farms experimenting with honey and naturally processed microlots. The more time we spend on the ground visiting growing regions, the more we uncover of this unique and lush country.

The value chain:

One distinct feature of coffee production in Mexico is the very high presence of fair trade and organic coffee available. This allows LCM to offer our customers a wide range of competitively priced certified coffee. Descamex also has a state-of-the-art facility just outside of Veracruz City where all of our El Tucan decaf is processed. As a country, most coffee exported is packed in 69kg bags, but we also offer down packing and upsizing to 1MT bulk bags.

How we buy from Mexico:

Being such a large country requiring, we rely on our exporting partners cupping everything prior to conducting our own QA assessment. This ensures a high and consistent standard of the coffees we even consider for purchase. We are always looking for unique and rewarding lots as we learn and visit this region more regularly.

Cupping Profile:

From the lower altitude areas found within the state of Veracruz which traditionally provide rich and lower acid coffee to the peak of the Oaxacan mountains, Mexican coffees are extremely varied. Floral, cinnamon and cardamom are some of the unique cupping notes we have found in high grown coffees from Oaxaca and Chiapas, whilst honey and natural coffees from Veracruz will boast rum, chocolate and port wine flavour notes.

Peru
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Country:
Peru
Geography:

1200 – 2000m Altitude, temperatures averaged between 20 – 26 degrees Celsius in coffee producing regions

Varieties:

Typica, Caturra, Catimor, Pache

Harvest Season:

April to August.

MOQ:

60kg

Usage:

Both northern and southern Peru produce coffees that shine in a variety of brewing methods.

Flavour Profile:

Typical profile consists of prominent chocolate notes, crisp and dry malic acidity with a long and creamy finish.

Overview:

Coffee has been in production in Peru from the middle of the 17th Century. Typica, the heirloom variety in Peru makes up the bulk of its production, with most coffee farms situated between 1200 to 2000 MASL. With most farms under 3 HA in size, coffee is often consolidated and sold at the neighbouring towns Plaza. Due to the small size of lots, milling is often done by hand operated wet mills and small wooden fermentation tanks are generally commonplace. Over the last two decades, 20 – 30% of small-scale producers have begun working with cooperatives that are Fairtrade and organic certified. Cooperatives are certified and overseen by the National Coffee Board of Peru (Junta Nacional de Café). The main coffee producing regions in Peru are:

  • Cajamarca
  • Cuzco
  • San Martin
  • Junin
Relationships at origin:

LCM currently works with producers and cooperatives in the San Ignacio district of the Cajamarca region. The northern highlands of the surrounding Andes provide extremely fertile soil for dynamic coffee growth. Coffees from this region typically provide slightly more pronounced acidity, and a softer finish.

Sourcing Strategy:

LCM relies on our partners on the ground in Cajamarca to match single producer lots to our bespoke needs and mix them together to create a regional blender. When certain producers lots stand out or offer something truly unique, they are isolated, and will be milled separately prior to export.

The value chain:

We offer lot specific selection of regional blenders and the opportunity to cup and assess all coffees we have access to through our valued partners on the ground. Customisable bag sizes range from 35kg to metric tonne bulk bags.

How we buy from Peru:

Being such a large country requiring, we rely on our exporting partners cupping everything prior to conducting our own QA assessment. This ensures a high and consistent standard of the coffees we even consider for purchase. We are always looking for unique and rewarding lots as we learn and visit this region more regularly.

Cupping Profile:

While the lush and verdant slopes of Cajamarca will offer some effervescence and crisp acidity, all producing regions of Peru have the tendency to showcase rich and dominant chocolate and cocoa nib notes.

Costa Rica
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Country:
Costa Rica
Geography:

800 – 1700m Masl, Average temperatures from 16 to 32 degrees in coffee producing regions

Varieties:

Catuai, Caturra, Bourbons. Experimental and exotic varieties

Harvest Season:

January-May

Arrival

May-July

Usage:

Used largely for filter and “guest espresso”. Larger lots used as components in Espresso blends

Flavour Profile:

Berries, Jammy, Malic acidity, stone fruit, florals

Overview:

A beautiful and comparatively stable country, Costa Rica enjoys a much higher standard of living than some of it’s neighbours. It’s diverse mountain ranges, rainforests and beaches are a tourist hotspot, attracting millions of visitors every year. Given it’s stability, Costa Rica is a more expensive place to travel and do business than other central American countries and this is reflected in coffee prices. The industry is monitored and a minimum living wage is in place for farmers and workers. Quality has improved immensely as cost of production is high, meaning CR cannot compete on price. The diversity and investment in processing is unparalleled, making Costa Rica a hotbed for some of the worlds most exotic coffees. The future of Costa Rican coffee seems to lie in this area.

The value chain:

We offer lot specific selection of regional blenders and the opportunity to cup and assess all coffees we have access to through our valued partners on the ground. Customisable bag sizes range from 35kg to metric tonne bulk bags.

Honduras
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Country:
Honduras
Geography:

1000 to 1500 MASL, average temperatures 14 to 22.5 degrees in coffee producing regions

Varieties:

Bourbon, Caturra, Catuai, Typica, Pacas

Harvest Season:

November to April

Usage:

Mainly used in espresso blends but new specialty lots is also used as single-serve

Flavour Profile:

Varies from heavy chocolatey to delicate citric and fruity flavours depending on region and process

Overview:

Coffee was introduced to Honduras in 18th century.  Its fertile soil, favorable attitude, and suitable microclimate make it well suited for specialty coffee production, and it’s capable of producing a variety of types of coffees. It is today the 5th largest coffee producing country in the world, but it wasn’t before in the 1960’s that it really began. Before that Bananas was the main crop counting for more than 80% in 1920’s. In the 80’s and 90’s new laws were passed to encourage coffee production. The first encouraged landowners to expand their coffee production and provided coffee-producing municipalities subsidies to build and maintain roads. The second increased land property titles, allowing cooperative members to divide holdings into smaller plots and by this the coffee production increased by 200%. In 98 Honduras was struck by hurricane Mitch which destroyed about 80 % of the country’s crop producing losses amounting to 40% of the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and with the international coffee prices collapsing in 99 many producers chose to diversifying their crop or abandoning it altogether. Since then Honduras coffee has again steadily improved and with specialty coffee being promoted and now coffee is in the hands of 102,000 producers. 90% of them are smallholders and create around one million jobs between picking, coffee processing, and transportation”. According to IHCAFE, coffee is now Honduras’ main agricultural product for exportation, adding more than 3% to the country’s GDP and close to 30% to the agricultural GDP. Most of the coffee produced in Honduras comes from mountainous regions of 210 of the 298 municipalities and 15 of the 18 departments of the country, generating more than one million jobs. Regions listed below:

  • COBAN
  • OPALACA
  • MONTECILLOS
  • COMAYAGUA
  • EL PARAISO
  • AGALTA
Relationships at origin:

Langdon Coffee Merchants works with various exporting agencies alongside co-ops and producers directly. Our relationships on the ground are imperative in our purchasing and sourcing of Honduran coffee.

Sourcing Strategy:

Langdon Coffee Merchants commits to specific regional blenders each year incl. organic and FT organic which have become the backbone of our Honduran coffee offerings. We offer precontract these coffees to our valued customer and offer the chance to cup Pre-Shipment samples prior to the coffee being commercially milled. Single producer lots will often come with pricing transparency down to the wet mill and we will gladly pass this information on to customers. All coffee purchased must pass our internal QA process at our Cupping Lab in South Melbourne.

The value chain:

We offer lot specific selection of regional blenders and the opportunity to cup and assess all coffees we have access to through our valued partners on the ground.

How we buy from Honduras:

Langdon Coffee Merchants relies heavily on our partners on the ground at origin. We visit, cup and calibrate with them regularly.

Cupping Profile:

Honduran coffees can range from bright, acidic flavor profiles, lightly fruited and with strong cane sugar sweetness, to more chocolatey and caramel-like, lower acidity coffees depending on region, altitude and process.

Guatemala
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Country:
Guatemala
Geography:

1100 – 2100m Altitude, Average temperatures from 16 to 32 degrees in coffee producing regions

Varieties:

Bourbon, Pache, Caturra, Catuai, Marogype Varities.

Harvest Season:

October to April Harvest

Usage:

Often used as in espresso blends but certain regions produce some of the best coffee in the world.

Flavour Profile:

Ranging from rich and chocolatey from Antigua to sparkling and delicate fruit bombs from Coban.

Overview:

For over 150 years, Coffee has been grown, sold and exported from various regions in Guatemala. Currently it comprises of 40% of all agricultural revenue and employs approximately 12% of the working population. Despite its relatively small size as a country, Guatemala boasts one of the most unique and diverse climates in the world. The 20 (of 22) Regiones (or Departments) that currently grow coffee range from lush, verdant valleys to seemingly endless and somewhat dry plateaus. The national coffee association, Anacafe’, assists growers with information in regards to export markets, agronomy and also proudly promotes Guatemalan coffees to the world. This organisation has a facility and cupping lab in Guatemala City and encourages transparency and fare pricing throughout the country. Anacafe has defined 8 specific coffee producing regions:

  • Antigua
  • Acatenango Valley
  • San Marcos
  • Huehuetenango
  • Atitlan
  • Fraijanes Plateau
  • New Oriente
  • Coban
Relationships at origin:

Langdon Coffee Merchants works with various exporting agencies alongside co-ops and producers directly. Our relationships on the ground are imperative in our purchasing and sourcing of Guatemalan coffee. We work alongside the Vides Family, Kofei S.A and Coffee Farmers Alliance to find the most unique and spectacular coffees coming out of this beautiful country.

Sourcing Strategy:

Langdon Coffee Merchants commits to specific regional blenders each year which have become the backbone of our Guatemalan coffee offerings. We offer precontract these coffees to our valued customer and offer the chance to cup Pre-Shipment samples prior to the coffee being commercially milled. Single producer lots will often come with pricing transparency down to the wet mill and we will gladly pass this information on to customers. All coffee purchased must pass our internal QA process at our Cupping Lab  in South Melbourne.

The value chain:

We offer lot specific selection of regional blenders and the opportunity to cup and assess all coffees we have access to through our valued partners on the ground. Customisable bag sizes range from 35kg to metric tonne bulk bags.

How we buy from Guatemala:

Langdon Coffee Merchants relies heavily on our partners on the ground at origin. We visit, cup and calibrate with them regularly. Traversing such varied and rugged terrain takes up a considerable amount of time and with the help of our friends on the ground (and their trusty Jeeps) we are fortunate enough to explore various regions and meet farmers directly.

Cupping Profile:

The abundance of rich volcanic soil in highland areas promotes strong and fertile coffee production and lends itself to producing deliciously clean, vibrant and sparkling coffees. Other regions that are at lower altitudes produce rich and creamy cups with an abundance of body and sweetness. Guatemala is a very diverse country with countless flavour profiles!

Mexico
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Country:
Mexico
Geography:

900m – 1800m altitude, average temperatures from 18 to 30 degrees in coffee producing regions

Varieties:

Bourbon, Typica, Catuai, Mundo Novo, Maragogype, Catimor, Caturra

Harvest Season:

November - March

MOQ:

69kg Bag

Usage:

Full bodied coffees from lower growing regions make excellent espresso blenders, where higher grown coffees often shine as a filter brew

Flavour Profile:

Heavy and moreish coffees from Veracruz to delicate and refined coffees with prominent spice notes from Chiapas and Oaxaca

Overview:

Despite being introduced in the 1700s by Spanish settlers, Mexico only started to value this agricultural stock after border and land disputes in the 1850s. As other Europeans made their way to purchase cheap land in Mexico, the government realised that some of this precious, fertile land (especially in states such as Chiapas and Oaxaca) could produce tremendous and consistent crops of Arabica coffee. Shortly after the Mexican revolution, the government started granting incentives to coffee farmers to help promote and sell their prized coffee to the world. More than 70% of coffee farmers in Mexico operate and farm on less than 10 hectares of land. There are four main growing regions throughout the country

  • Chiapas
  • Oaxaca
  • Puebla
  • Veracruz
Relationships at origin:

LCM works primarily alongside an exporting group based in Veracruz. From this base, we travel up into the mountains to meet directly with producers and explore the wider growing regions of the state. We are growing our Mexican position to work and visit directly with more producers in Chiapas and Oaxaca, but at this stage a lot of the coffee sourced from these regions is commercially milled then blended to form a specific profile that suits our customers’ needs.

Sourcing Strategy:

Most of the Mexican coffee we purchase are regional blenders that we cup and assess alongside our customers. We have recently had the chance to visit some farms experimenting with honey and naturally processed microlots. The more time we spend on the ground visiting growing regions, the more we uncover of this unique and lush country.

The value chain:

One distinct feature of coffee production in Mexico is the very high presence of fair trade and organic coffee available. This allows LCM to offer our customers a wide range of competitively priced certified coffee. Descamex also has a state-of-the-art facility just outside of Veracruz City where all of our El Tucan decaf is processed. As a country, most coffee exported is packed in 69kg bags, but we also offer down packing and upsizing to 1MT bulk bags.

How we buy from Mexico:

Being such a large country requiring, we rely on our exporting partners cupping everything prior to conducting our own QA assessment. This ensures a high and consistent standard of the coffees we even consider for purchase. We are always looking for unique and rewarding lots as we learn and visit this region more regularly.

Cupping Profile:

From the lower altitude areas found within the state of Veracruz which traditionally provide rich and lower acid coffee to the peak of the Oaxacan mountains, Mexican coffees are extremely varied. Floral, cinnamon and cardamom are some of the unique cupping notes we have found in high grown coffees from Oaxaca and Chiapas, whilst honey and natural coffees from Veracruz will boast rum, chocolate and port wine flavour notes.

Our Credentials

Coffee Harvest Calendar

Fresh shipments of green coffee beans land in our UK, New Zealand and Australian warehouses monthly where we invite you to taste their quality over a professional cupping with us.

Periods